Adidas Stan Smith Damen

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Adidas Stan Smith Damen

Postby sooo » Mon Jul 15, 2019 6:50 pm

For decades, Nike dominated the United States athletic-footwear market. “Dominated” might not be strong enough a word: Thanks to 50 years of ad campaigns like "It's gotta be the shoes!," game-changing technology from Air to Shox, and an authentic connection with actual people buying their shoes, in 2014 the Swoosh owned 48 percent of the market—a margin so big it seemed like no brand could even begin to threaten their reign. But that’s exactly what happened. That same year, Adidas poached Kanye West, started re-issuing its most iconic sneakers, Nike Cortez Mujer and developed its own game-changing tech. The result? In 2016 and 2017, it's been eating away at Nike's market share.

Earlier this year, sneaker-industry analysts heralded a potential changing of the guard. In June of 2017, Adidas's share jumped to 11.3 percent, Adidas ZX Flux Femme leapfrogging a sluggish, oversaturated Jordan Brand. Kanye West's Yeezy Boost line caused (and continues to cause) online frenzies, and Adidas Originals' NMD sneakers became a staple for hype-friendly teens and sneaker-conscious regular bros alike. For the first time, Nike seemed to be lagging behind Adidas in the category customers seemed to care about more with each passing day: fashion collaborations. The Swoosh had worked with former Givenchy designer Riccardo Tisci, German techwear brand Acronym, and even tennis legend Roger Federer, but these were easy to perceive Adidas Gazelle Donna as one-off designer interpretations of existing Nike kicks—unlike the full-fledged partnerships Adidas established with Kanye West, Pharrell, or even Raf Simons, each of which has designed their own Adidas sneaker from scratch. For much of the last three years, Adidas Nike Epic React Flyknit Mujer felt like the brand with its finger on the pulse, while Nike seemed to be fighting uphill to get its core products—running and basketball sneakers—into the hands of customers.

As 2017 comes to a close, the tides are turning once again. Only this time, they're in Nike's favor. At the time of this writing, Nike's stock was up $11 over the past three months, while Adidas's was down approximately $25. For the first time in years, Q2 of 2017 saw Adidas's classics (Stan Smith, Superstar, Gazelle) have flat sales figures. Nike's mojo, for the moment, seems to be coming Adidas Superstar Femme back, thanks in large part to four sneakers that each helped the brand in a different way: the Zoom VaporFly 4%, Nike Air VaporMax, LeBron 15, and Off-White x Nike Air Jordan 1. The Three Stripes is still a bigger threat than ever to Nike's dominance, but there's no doubt that 2017 belonged to the Swoosh. Here’s why.

Nike is the reigning champ of the sneaker business—still, despite some healthy competition in recent years—with its market share of American athletic footwear at an impressive 45%. Of course, sitting in the number-one spot doesn't mean you can rest easy. At its heels are brands like Adidas and Puma—which continue to pick up steam thanks to innovation and collaborations—both of which have had enormous financial and cultural success of late. Innovation has always been at the core of Nike's design philosophy, whether Adidas Stan Smith Damen with concept-car models like the self-lacing HyperAdapt 1.0 or real-world game-changers. With the just-unveiled VaporMax, Nike is trying to change the game once again.

The VaporMax is the most radical change-up to the Air Max running-shoe line in years. As was the case with the original Air Max in 1987, the most jarring part of the Nike VaporMax is its sole. It's anything but sleek when compared to the kicks the Swoosh normally produces. But Nike doesn't make out-there designs for the sake of making out-there designs (just ask legendary Nike designer Tinker Hatfield, Adidas Gazelle Womens whose original Air Max concept—the Air Max Zero—was actually shot down in the mid-’80s). Nike designs for athletes and performance first, which is why it wear-tested the VaporMax with the help of 350 people who in total ran 126,000 miles in the sneakers before turning Nike Air Max 95 Donna them over to the public.
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